A critical analysis of science fiction the handmaids tale

They are assigned to Commanders, who undergo a regular procreational ceremony with the handmaids, with the wife not only present, but lying directly under the handmaid to create the illusion that she is to be the impregnated vessel.

First of all, many women in Gilead support the regime and help to keep other women in line. Only certain pre-scripted greetings are allowed, and even the signs on stores are pictorial symbols.

Offred learns that the Commander carried on a similar relationship with his previous handmaid and that she killed herself when his wife found out. Nature demands variety, for men. Atwood may be reminding her readers that women have traditionally served to enforce the rules of a patriarchal society, from bearing responsibility for the socialization of young girls to the policing of adult nonconformists through ridicule or ostracism.

Further, Atwood questions what would happen if these trends, and especially "casually held attitudes about women" were taken to their logical end. Historical and Cultural Lore Dances would have been held there; the music lingered, a palimpsest of unheard sound, style upon style, an undercurrent of drums, a forlorn wail, garlands made of tissue-paper flowers, cardboard devils, a revolving ball of mirrors, powdering the dancers with a snow of light.

Handmaids are sometimes asked to take part in the executions, by beating the offenders and thus letting out some of their repressed urges. For Atwood the historical note serves several functions: The novel presents a terrifying picture of a repressive society in which attempts to learn and speak freely or to love as one chooses are punishable by death.

Pregnant Handmaids fear giving birth to a damaged child, or unbaby. But for issues that are controversial among feminists, like pornography and the institution of marriage, Atwood provides mouthpieces for diverging views, but does not seem to endorse one herself.

Atwood frustrates her readers purposefully to make some pointed remarks about the world of academia.

The Handmaid's Tale

Atwood may be reminding her readers that women have traditionally served to enforce the rules of a patriarchal society, from bearing responsibility for the socialization of young girls to the policing of adult nonconformists through ridicule or ostracism.

Offred describes her life during her third assignment as a handmaid, in this case to Fred Waterford referred to as "The Commander". Offred is more of an anti-heroine than a protagonist, as her conflicts against her society can not really be won.

All lower-status individuals are regulated by this dress code. Handmaids are women of proven fertility who have broken the law. Salinger's Catcher in the Rye, Offred frequently castigates herself for trying to maintain her humanity and fidelity to cherished morals and beliefs in a milieu that crushes dissent.

Waterford who was killed in a purge shortly after Offred was taken away, charged with harboring an enemy agent. First of all, many women in Gilead support the regime and help to keep other women in line. Literary Allusion I would not be able to stand it, I know that; Moira was right about me.

As she told the Guardian, "Science fiction has monsters and spaceships; speculative fiction could really happen. Volume 1 and the editor of the online journal The Satirist: They are expected to perform all the female functions: The need for what I may call birth services was already recognize in the pre-Gilead period, where it was being inadequately met by "artificial insemination," "fertility clinics," and the use of "surrogate mothers," who were hired for the purpose.

You can find the same in any power situation, such as politics or ideologies that purport to be atheist. Even women higher up in the hierarchy, such as Aunts who train the Handmaids and Wives, are often as miserable as the others.

Once we had to watch a woman being slowly cut into pieces, her fingers and breasts snipped off with garden shears, her stomach slit open and her intestines pulled out. The novel concludes with a metafictional epilogue that explains that the events of the novel occurred shortly after the beginning of what is called "the Gilead Period".

But since we always envision totalitarian governments as being total, we are always pleased and relieved to see the holes in the armor: His chauvinistic comment is significant in its designation of "some people. The Commanders rule over a rigidly hierarchical society.

Critical Survey of Science Fiction and Fantasy The Handmaid's Tale Analysis - Essay

Alliteration In the curved hallway mirror, I flit past, a red shape at the edge of my own field of vision, a wraith of red smoke. Euphemism Guns were for the guards, specially picked from the Angels.

Without books or newspapers, telephones or television, Offred has no means of assessing the severity of society's deprivations. Negative Utopia as Polemic: In addition, one of the Aunts tells the handmaids-in-training to stop "mooning and June-ing".

The emphasis here perhaps properly, given her ideological agenda is on domestic life in the new regime, rather than the political structure or international status of Gilead society. Even women higher up in the hierarchy, such as Aunts who train the Handmaids and Wives, are often as miserable as the others.

Young, unmarried girls are dressed in white. Offred has not seen her child since she and her family were captured trying to escape Gilead. The term appears to have been coined by Robert A. Heinlein, a popular and respected writer of "hard-core" science fiction (i.e.

science fiction that relies on the scientific accuracy of the problems and solutions included in the work). Critical Essays Literary Analysis of The Handmaid's Tale Bookmark this page Manage My Reading List A one-of-a-kind tour de force, Margaret Atwood's futuristic The Handmaid's Tale refuses categorization into a single style, slant, or genre.

The best study guide to The Handmaid’s Tale on the planet, from the creators of SparkNotes. Get the summaries, analysis, and quotes you need. A concise biography of Margaret Atwood plus historical and literary context for The Handmaid’s Tale.

The Handmaid’s Tale: Plot Summary. Speculative Fiction / Science Fiction / Dystopia. Some critics say that The Handmaid s Tale is a pure Science Fiction with little or no relevance to the actual society. Margaret Atwood wanted to show a way of how far contemporary errors lead to.

Actually she took facts from today (the book was written in ), and imagine how could become. The Handmaid's Tale may be seen as satire and as dystopian fiction and has been called ‘science fiction', though Atwood prefers the term ‘speculative fiction'.

Her writing also contains many elements of the Gothic; see, for example, Themes and significant ideas > Myth and fairy tale. The Handmaid Tale falls into the genre of science-fiction (or speculative fiction).

A science-fiction or speculative fiction novel is one though which a writer imagines a possible future and creates a story set in that possible future, exploring all the trials and tribulations that come with it.4/4(1).

A critical analysis of science fiction the handmaids tale
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The Handmaid's Tale Analysis